CHARLIE THE PEACOCK

ARTIST: TIM SCOFIELD, KYLE MILLER AND STEVE DALNEKOFF
LOCATION: ROOKWOOD POTTERY STUDIO
1920 RACE ST, 45202

SPONSORED BY WESTERN & SOUTHERN FINANCIAL GROUP

Charlie is a is a large illuminated and automated peacock. The peacock is automated to open and close its plume using an intricate series of hinges connected to hydraulically driven pushrods. When the peacock's plume is open it measures about 40 feet wide and 20 feet tall. The plume consists of 15,000 individually addressable LEDs. The LEDs are manipulated in real time by the artists to create a light show set to music.

ABOUT TIM SCOFIELD, KYLE MILLER AND STEVE DALNEKOFF

Tim Scofield and Kyle Miller are Baltimore sculptors who have been creating public art works for over fifteen years. In 2014 they collaborated with the Spanish artist collective Mmmm… to create the very popular and critically acclaimed BUS sculpture which sits at the corner of Eastern and East Avenues in the Highlandtown neighborhood of East Baltimore, in front of the Creative Alliance’s
Patterson Theater. In 2015 they were awarded the PNC Tranformative Art Prize to create a new sculptural bus stop, entitled Estamos Aqui, which was installed at the corners of Baltimore Street and Highland Avenue in the Baltimore Highlands
neighborhood. In 2016 they received a second PNC Transformative Art Prize to collaborate with muralist Shawn James and the Patterson Park Neighborhood Association to create another sculptural bus stop, a Chesapeake Bay themed piece located on E. Fayette Street in East Baltimore. They are currently working on two more sculptural bus stops that will be installed next year in Library Square next to the Patterson Park public library in East Baltimore. In 2016 they connected with local light artist Steve Dalnekoff and participated in the inaugural Light City Baltimore festival with their Peacock installation, a 20 foot tall, 40 foot wide lighted and automated peacock. The Peacock was invited back for Light City’s second year and since then has exhibited at several festivals including The Festival of Light in Jerusalem. Their primary artistic concerns are with scale, light, interactivity and kinetics.